Medical & Health

Transform your office into an oasis

Spring is here, although with the high temperatures it feels like summer, and after the cold winter months, it can be easy to forget how the heat can affect our efficiency and productivity.
Stuffy offices and closed environments make it difficult to concentrate and can negatively impact overall well-being. Yet there are ways to stay cool and comfortable as temperatures start rising.
Michael McKechnie, from Samsung Electronics, said that the secret to having a healthy, climate controlled environment at the office is to consider the latest air-conditioning technology.

Use an air-conditioning system
You can now install systems that offer both heating and cooling solutions in one. Many of these have been designed to deliver the optimum indoor climate, while minimising the impact on the environment. The units disperse cool air over a wider area, which allows for more effective temperature control into every corner.
“This ensures that your office is kept at the right temperature, without drawing on excessive energy and that the area stays cooler for longer,” said McKechnie.

Manage allergies
Summer is characterised by hay fever and allergies and investing in an air purifier system can help to relieve these symptoms.
It is important to keep this in mind and look for built-in features that help release the discomfort of seasonal allergy problems. Technology that assists in providing a cleaner and healthier work environment by neutralising the bacteria, fungi and pollen that causes allergic reactions is important.
“If you have hay fever or asthma, you already realise that clean air contributes to your well-being. Airborne allergens, viruses and infectious bacteria often go undetected.”
Air-conditioners can slow the growth of mould by removing excess humidity from the room.

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Do I need a flu jab?

If you’re in a vulnerable group it’s advisable to have a flu injection every year. It offers protection against the most common strains currently circulating so don’t assume last year’s vaccination will do the job this winter.

The over-65s, pregnant women and people with certain medical conditions should visit their GP and ask for the vaccine.

The best time to have a flu vaccine for maximum protection is the autumn.

Viruses linger on many surfaces including door handles, mobile phones and money so your hands can pick them up easily. They are spread by sneezing, coughing and hand contact. Try to avoid rubbing your eyes or touching your nose and mouth.

Stocking up the medicine cabinet

Prevention is better than cure but if you are struck down, the most effective remedies for many winter ailments don’t cost a fortune.

Your medicine cabinet should contain a basic painkiller such as paracetamol or ibuprofen.

They should be the first line of attack. They are good for treating most symptoms, including sore throats, headaches and sinus pain.

There is new evidence that taking echinacea the moment symptoms strike can reduce the duration of a cold. The same goes for high doses of vitamin C.

A hot drink containing honey and lemon has been shown to be just as effective as a costly cough mixture.

It’s a common misconception that antibiotics will cure a bad cold. They are only effective against bacteria and most colds are caused by viruses.

Information obtained from www.express.co.uk

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