Voortrekkers’ initiative to help wheelchair-bound citizens

Voortrekkers and Imperial staff with some of the many plastic caps and lids collected. Front row: Izak Hearn, Elize-Marie Hearn, Emily Mtshali and Anzelle Bezuidenhout. Back row: Sibongile Ngobeni, Katrien Smit, Belinah Mabuza and Marinica Arthur.

EMPLOYEES of Imperial have done their bit to ensure that the Voortrekkers achieve their mission to donate wheelchairs to the needy.

On November 3, Imperial staff handed over thousands of plastic bottle caps and lids to the foundation.

The caps and lids will be sold for recycling, helping to raise funds for the purchase of wheelchairs.

Voortrekkers are calling upon the rest of the Kempton Park community to take part in the initiative.

It takes 450kg of bottle caps and lids to buy one wheelchair.

“We have realised that there are many people who need wheelchairs and we have decided to lend a helping hand. We collect 450 kilograms of caps from cool-drink bottles and milk bottle lids. People can also bring the little tags from bread bags,” youth leader of the Voortrekkers’ Oord Oosvaal Anzelle Bezuidenhout said.

She said they were inspired to help after visiting children with disabilities at a local school.

“We realised that there is a great need for money to buy wheelchairs. We have also been to old age homes around Kempton Park, where we began to realise how fortunate we are. We wanted to embark on a journey where we could help others live better,” she said.

She said sleeves were rolled up as Voortrekkers started to organise people to collect thousands of caps and lids from all over Kempton Park.

“There is also a sign-up initiative online where everyone can make a request for a wheelchair on behalf of the needy. From that, people will be placed on a waiting list. As soon as a wheelchair is bought, it will be donated to that specific person,” she said.

People who wish to donate caps and lids and take part in the initiative can call 082 901 1284.

  AUTHOR
Tumi Riba
Journalist

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